Heartiste and Female Porn

Heartiste has an excellent post on how we ignore the effects of “female pornography” today, and how destructive it is on female behavior. Go read it here, and then come back for my comment on it below (which I also left there):

My comment:

Absolutely true. And people have noted this for a long time. I was even going to write a post about this, well done beating me to it, Dark Lords!

I would add that Netflix/Lifetime/Law & Order: SVU-ing of TV has made it all the worse. Not only can she read it, she can watch it streaming, in huge “binge watching” chunks till bed on weeknights and all on the weekends while recovering from her hangover and one-night stand. Eight to ten hours of pure nonsensical fantasy. What an impact on her psyche!

In Victorian Times, one of the signs of a woman with mental/emotional problems was if she read novels—especially “French” novels. Occasionally, you’ll see feminist websites today pass around and laugh about lists of the “signs” of “female hysteria” from that time—-which included novel-reading, obstinacy in obeying their father, and desire to wear pants.

Looking back, however, from a 21st century red pill point of view, it’s clear those “signs” were spot on. A quarrelsome woman knee-deep in exotic fantasies via market-fiction, wanting to wear non-feminine or  non-wholesome clothing, and rejecting her father’s authority—what are those except signs of a broken woman today, who will be riddled with tattoos, piercings, one-night-stands, and tagged with a future as a miserable single mom?

Some 19th Century serious novelists were up on this. In Anthony Trollope’s The Eustace Diamonds, one of the ways he signals that the main female character is of low moral quality is that on Sundays, instead of going to church, she stays in bed all day reading novels. This leads her to her having a very bizarre book-inspired fantasies that she gradually thinks will become real—that a “corsair” (i.e. a pirate) will come, kidnap her, and take her away to exotic lands and become her lover. That main character’s solipsism  is positively Becky Sharpe-esque.

Also, as to Jane Austen—Austen was actually partially mocking the romance-genre of her time, as she herself was quite conservative on social issues; for example, she was critical of the young  British prince of her time being foppish and unserious and a party-boy.

Austen’s mocking/parody tone was much in the same vein that Don Quixote began as a mocking of the chivalric romances popular in Cervantes’s time. Austen’s  novels had a satire in them that hasn’t come down—having her be a representative of romance today is a little bit like having Mel Brooks’s History of the World, Part I become known in about a century as a work of serious historical fiction.

2 Responses to “Heartiste and Female Porn”

  1. Canadian Friend Says:

    Like kids, like teenagers, and like certain types of men, all that is necessary for women to do bad things is for good men to do nothing, and give them too much freedom.

    Look at what women have chosen to do with their liberty; ugly tattoos, ugly face and body piercings, one side of the head shaved like a deranged person, ugly black nail polish as if life was a Haloween party, ugly dark brown lipstick, getting drunk until she does not know if she is having sex with a man or a bottle of beer, or until she passes out, doing drugs, and so on and so forth.

    crime and violent crimes also went up with feminism.

    and there are so many other things, lowering standards so that women can get a job or get in the military, or giving promotions to women just so they will not complain

    women in position of power doing the craziest things such as Merkel

    feminism helped women a tiny bit in certain areas but was mostly a destructive force.

    so destructive that feminists are taking Western Civilization down with them.

  2. Lucius Somesuch Says:

    Synchronicity I guess, but CH just posted something on this again tonight- as CF notes above, the hipster and sub-hipster fashion fetishes, the seeming obliviousness to self-depth charged SMV or, we might more quaintly call out, all-out self-destruction.

    Flaubert knocks those same “French novels” which Emma Bovary in the convent read (presumably in the original!). And of course though it almost certainly wasn’t De Sade, the impact of all that low and middlebrow “escapism” is tremendous.

    Austen’s “Northanger Abbey” takes what at first seem almost an hilariously benign crazy for reading Gothic fiction and uses it to push her heroine Catherine to a comical but borderline pathological paranoia– imagining the father of her love interest to have faked his wife’s death so he could keep her a prisoner.

    The speech in which Henry Tilney realizes Catherine’s delusion and, barely containing his disgust, tells her off, makes for curious reading today, since it takes the form of an encomium to Christian England, a land of laws and polite manners, which wouldn’t be so persuasive a response in the light of Rotherham.

    Back to contemporary fashion: it clearly has a lot to do with the gheys, who excite in some women an almost gnostic excitation. I guess it’s really almost vampiric when it comes to that– the fantasy of living in some kind of alternate reality where trends, snark, skinniness, and cocaine can keep them young and fabulous forever.

    Steve Sailer, who occasionally says odd, knowing things about coke (not my scene!) once memorably invoked the idea of girls getting out of taxis in fashion photography, skitting around merrily, made to feel light as air thanks to the coke. Interesting take.

    Marathon television viewing is an odd phenomenon. I once marathoned The Godfather Trilogy in a day, to much exhilaration, but I can’t see what they get out of spending Saturday inside watching Season Four of whatever.

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